Speaking to Your Doctor about the Menopause

speaking to my doctor about the menopause

When you pay a visit to your doctor, naturally you will want to make the most of your time and come away with a better understanding of the menopause, and the necessary lifestyle changes, various treatments and hormone therapies that are available for transitioning into the menopause. In order for that to happen, here are some tips for your visit:

Review important information about yourself

Your doctor will need to know your chosen food diet, your level of physical activity, your medical, emotional and sexual history, your habits of smoking, alcohol or drug use, if you have any allergies to any prescription drugs, foods etc and whether you have or are undergoing any help or treatment from another professional, such as an endocrine or hormone specialist etc.

Make a list of all your past and current symptoms

Briefly give some detail about how each symptom in the menopause makes you feel, if the symptom is triggered by anything in particular, and any treatments you have taken, medical or holistic, as a form of relief and if it has helped.

Don’t be embarrassed, it’s all very normal

Your doctor will have seen a very large number of women who have communicated the exact or similar concerns that you hold, so make sure you address them all. No matter how sensitive the topic generally feels for you, your doctor will not be shocked in the slightest. Remember to take a loved one as extra support with you, especially if you feel confused or overwhelmed with the menopause and could benefit with a second pair of ears to absorb and recall the information you are given or for asking any helpful questions on your behalf.

Question everything recommended to you

It is crucial to have crystal clear understanding on what you are being advised, specifically on prescription drugs or therapies. After all, this is your body, you deserve to receive information on positive studies/reviews and if what is being recommended for you, holds the results you are seeking. Most importantly, you need to question the dangerous side effects involved (medical drugs always have side effects).

Make sure you follow test or treatment protocols correctly

When it comes to being administered test or treatments, make sure you follow the method exactly. For drugs, you need to find out what happens if you were to miss a dose and if there are any lifestyle changes or other medications/supplements that you need to avoid whilst taking it. For tests, be sure to know how to prepare for the test, any risks or side effects from the test and when/where you can access the results.

Get a second opinion if it feels right 

It is highly acceptable, and within normal procedure to ask your doctor for a second opinion if you need more insight and a different perspective on certain information that you have been given from your doctor. You can either ask for a different doctor in the same practice or for recommendations or referrals elsewhere and your medical information can be sent to them to avoid any repetitive analysis. If you have health insurance, just make sure a second opinion is covered in your policy.

Be cautious of the internet 

Looking at information on the internet can be complicated and overwhelming, especially as the internet is a vast ocean of contradicting information and we don’t really know how much we can personalise the opinions we read, but we do. This could make our feelings and beliefs about the menopause, a lot heavier, unnecessarily, especially if we are seeking from an emotional state of fear, worry and anxiety. Seeing a doctor in person, to look over your personal records and to have a physical exam/check-up is a lot more sensible and practical.

 

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Disclaimer:

Become™️ has a wonderful team of experts who all helped in the writing of this content. The opinions expressed within this page are the opinions of many people we asked, and from information we researched online. Become™️ is not responsible for the accuracy, completeness, suitability, or validity of any information on this page. All information is provided on an as-is basis.