Joint Pain and the Menopause: Unexpected Aches

Menopause Joint Pain

If you’re finding it hard to get out of bed in the morning, you may just put it down to getting a bit older. But there might be a chance that your joint pain or sore back is actually a symptom of the menopause. Luckily, there are lots of things to try that will soothe your aches and have you back on your feet in no time.

Why does the menopause cause joint pain?

Many women may not associate joint pain with the menopause, so recognising your symptoms can sometimes be hard. But we know that from the age of around 45, when your oestrogen levels start dropping, the fluctuating hormone levels can cause your joints to start aching and even become inflamed. It’s not unusual for your body to feel sore, especially in the high-impact areas, so the knees, hips and back.

What does menopause joint pain feel like?

It will vary from person to person, but typical symptoms include feeling stiff in the morning, hurting a bit more than usual after exercise and a feeling that your joints are hot and swollen. You may find you get pain anywhere from the shoulder and neck, to your ankles and, most commonly, in your hands. It’s now become such a widespread symptom of the menopause that many people refer to this sort of joint pain as ‘menopausal arthritis’. But don’t despair, help is at hand.

What can help with menopausal joint pain?

Waking up with joint pain may make you feel anxious and distressed, as it might feel very strange, or be the first time that you have experienced your body hurting in this way. But the good news is that a few simple lifestyle changes can be a great help in getting you back to your old self.  

Popular remedies for menopausal joint pain

Here are some ideas that can help with joint pain to try at home:

  • Stay hydrated and eat well [link to healthy eating page]
  • Try some gentle exercises to keep joints moving [link to exercise page]
  • Try a natural anti-inflammatory or cooling cream with eucalyptus or aloe vera [link to relevant pages]
  • Look at alternative remedies that can help in the menopause such as soya,  ginseng and black cohosh [link to relevant page]
  • Take a vitamin supplement such as magnesium  [link to relevant page]
  • Stay cool and comfortable [link to Become clothes]

It’s often a good idea to speak to your GP if you are worried about your symptoms, or if they are severe, as they will be able to offer more advice and medication if required.